Tuesday, August 24, 2010

I Miss College

Craig Wilson was waxing nostalgic about college in a usatoday.com article.  He starts with the old "college is wasted on the young".  Which is, of course, true. I remember our revered English teacher, Mr. Mullaly, telling us in highschool,  "They say that high school is the best years of your lives.  That's B.S.  It is college.  College is the best thing going.  Trust me."  And I did.  And he was right.  My only regret is that I spent my last semester thinking about the next thing - going home, getting a job, whatever with the boyfriend - instead of enjoying every last minute of it.  Anyway, the punchline was this:

I propose every 60-year-old in America gets sent back to college. Maybe not for four years. I'd take one. We'd appreciate the second chance, perhaps even learn something this time around.

I am often telling people that whenever you go to college, it is a good thing.  If you go at 18, you get it done and get the letters behind your name.  If you go at 40, you appreciate it more.  And study more, learn more and probably get better grades. 

Wilson started thinking about it during farewell parties for the college-bound freshmen.  I think about it every year when the campus gear hits Bed Bath & Beyond.  Who cares about the kids when there are so many new space-saving ways to store your shoes? 

Except that when I was in college, I had maybe three pairs.

The point is, kids, every part of the college experience is a privilege and if Wilson's Bill passed, I would absolutely go back.  But I might skip the dorms next time.


Fluffycat said...

Hell no on the having a roommate business. I think that's the worst part, and as much as I resented it then, I'm older and meaner now. (Though thankfully far less passive-aggressive - which might lead to less long term problems and more arguments.)

Karen Funk Blocher said...

Yes, I strongly agree with this. My first attempt at college (1975-79) was a major growth experience, but more for the living away from home part and meeting new friends and such, not so much for the actual learning. The night classes at University of Phoenix (2002-5) were a completely different experience. The learning part was way more important, more interesting and more successful. At 60? That's in less than seven years for me. Is it too late to go to law school?